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Cartel de los Soles

By InSight Crime

The term “Cartel of the Suns” (Cartel de los Soles) is used to describe shadowy groups inside Venezuela’s military that traffic cocaine. It is in some ways a misleading term, as it creates the impression that there is a hierarchical group, made up primarily of military officials, that sets the price of cocaine inside the country. There are cells within the main branches of the military - the army, navy, air force, and National Guard, from the lowest to the highest levels - that essentially function as drug trafficking organizations. However, describing them as a “cartel” in the traditional sense would be a leap. It is not clear how the relationship between these cells works, although rivalries between them has apparently turned deadly in the past.

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Crimea: A Case of Déjà Vu

By Vasile Rotaru

Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the Kremlin has never hesitated to use its hard power in the near abroad whenever it has considered its strategic interests to be at stake. 

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Venezuelan Anti-Government Protests Likely To Continue

By Diego Moya-Ocampos

University students and civil society groups are likely to continue staging anti-government protests and roadblocks despite incumbent president Nicolás Maduro's calls for dialogue. 

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Should Britain’s Railways Be Nationalised?

By Roland Bensted

The UK’s privatised railways are less efficient, and a bigger drain on public resources than the former British Rail. Nationalisation should be considered. 

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The International Criminal Court and Kenyan 2013 Elections

By Njoki Wamai

The 4 March 2013 election was a defining moment in Kenya’s post-independence history. This election was significant for several reasons. 

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When Democracies Make Wrong Decisions

By Shilpa Rao

Recent events in India and the US have threatened the very ethos of those torch-bearer democracies. 

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Royal Charter on Press Regulation: A False Dichotomy

By Joe Attwood

The authors of the Royal Charter on the Self-Regulation of the Press have come under a great deal of criticism in recent weeks, but if there is one thing that can be said of them it is that they have certainly read the Leveson Report.