Regions

AP Photo/Saurabh Das

Sierra Leone: It Did Happen

By David Bayon

Sierra Leone is a beautiful country on the bulge of West Africa. Coconut palms and flame trees line its beaches against some of the most amazing sunsets I have seen ever. Lush green mountains and white sands under pure blue skies reflect the three colours of the national flag. 

US Navy/Michael A. Blaha

Past the Eleventh Hour: US Withdrawal from Iraq

By Katherine Opoka

After eight months of political deadlock, the incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has been tasked with forming a new government in Iraq. The re-election of the Shiite leader has sparked fresh waves of scepticism internationally as his government’s ability to maintain security in the weakened Iraqi state has been questioned. Following the 7 March 2010 National Elections, the insurgency has persisted, once again threatening to ignite tensions and fuel sectarian conflict across Iraq. As Iraq enters the eleventh hour, what is the future of the fledgling state? 

AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa De Olza

The Markets Have Spoken

By David Bayon

According to Alberto Recarte, one of Spain’s leading economists and President of the media group, Libertad Digital, Spain needs at least EUR€150,000 million in order to survive 2011. For 2012, the amount would be slightly higher.

© Miro Gavran

Of Novel and Books

By Miro Gavran

As a child, I loved to read. That carried on into my youth, and has lasted right up until today. I love books, I love to touch them and love to spend time in new and old libraries. 

AP Photo/Nader Daoud

Reform Needs to Boycott ... Boycott!

By Manar Rachwani

According to Jordan’s Minister of Political Development Musa Maaytah, the Islamic Movement of Jordan would have won at least 20 out of 120 seats of the Lower House of Parliament, if it had not decided to boycott elections. But from the point of view of the Islamic Movement such claims, although supported by the Jordanian Centre for Strategic Studies, have no foundations. 

AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

Terrorism in Mexico, Misperceptions and Misconceptions

By Mauricio Meschoulam

“How can you actually live there?” an American PhD student colleague asked me just a month ago. “Aren’t they shooting each other in the streets all the time?” “Watch out, you might be killed for what you’re writing about”. If outside of Mexico the general perception about the country is like this, inside of our borders the situation is not very different. A recent survey revealed that most people believe that more civilians than cartel members have been killed in the drug war, which is very far from the truth. 

AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner

Ghajar Divided Again

By Massimiliano Fiore

On 17 November, the residents of Ghajar, a divided village straddling the border between Lebanon and Israel, took to the streets to protest against the Israeli Security Cabinet’s approval of a plan to unilaterally withdraw the Israel Defence Force (IDF) from the northern half of the village.