Regions

NTC

What Lies Ahead for Libya

By Lauren Meryl Willamson

The existence of heavily armed civilians, remaining supporters for the Gaddafi regime, and a political system in chaos make for a difficult road ahead as the National Transition Council (NTC) seeks to gain legitimacy and control in Libya. Chatham House’s 18 August 2011 report Libya: Policy Options for Transition examines possible solutions including calling for the return of the skilled diaspora, restoring services and supplies and diversifying Libya’s oil-dependent economy. When the Chatham House held this discussion on the transition options for Libya, it was apparent that Tripoli would be key. It was unclear then whether it would be a quick triumph for rebels or an extensive, bloody battle. Just six days after, Gaddafi’s compound in Tripoli was seized. But what looked initially to be a speedy takeover, has exposed deeper challenges for the transition ahead.

Chinese_Military

The Regional Future of East Asia

By Thomas French

China's rise will present both challenges and opportunities for states in the region.
China's economic growth, if sustainable will help to maintain the internal security of the emerging superpower.
The growth of the Chinese economy and its greater reliance on external energy and resource supplies will result in a more externally focused diplomatic and military posture. This may result in a regional arms race. China, the US and India and the constellation of states around each will form the likely balance of power over the next two decades. 

Aiducation

Human Capital: Investing in Africa

By Roland Bensted and Lauren Meryl Williamson

Education and development go hand in hand. Educated individuals experience superior personal fulfilment and contribute positively to societal development. Education, as Dr. Florian Kapitza put it, is a crucial “building block”. For Sandy Balfour, it is “liberating”, both for individuals and societies. But the problem facing many African countries is that the resources to provide such education aren’t readily available – at least not locally. Furthermore, many highly qualified professionals, such as doctors, lawyers, and academics leave in their thousands every year to advance their careers in the West. This is where aid plays its part. 

Korea Strategy

China’s Uncertain Development

By Andrew Gawthorpe

The credit crunch and political paralysis in the western world has enhanced speculation about the future of China, a country which superficially seems to be doing so better than Europe or America. The headline economic growth rate in China in the three months to June 2011 was 9,5 per cent, against a figure of 0,2 per cent for Britain and 1 per cent in the US. It is little wonder that western politicians eyeball China’s trajectory enviously. Meanwhile, China’s growing economic weight has not only made it indispensible to solving global economic problems, but also seems to be translating into growing political and security influence as well. If one was needed, a reminder came recently with the launch of the country’s first aircraft carrier.

EU Med Policy

Rethinking the EU's Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Policy

By Massimiliano Fiore

The revolts sweeping through the Mediterranean and the Middle East have exposed the tremendous shortcomings of EU policy towards the region. That policy mistakenly equated short-term stability with deeper and long-term sustainability. In a number of recent speeches, European commissioners have admitted they were wrong to prioritise short-term interests, centred on economic cooperation, security and migration management. 

Mogoeng

A Questionable Appointment

By Sarah Logan

In early September, South Africa’s Judicial Services Commission (JSC) interrogated President Jacob Zuma’s nominee for the position of Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court, Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng, in an effort to establish his suitability for the top judicial post in South Africa. The JSC’s interviewing of Chief Justice nominees is a procedure provided for in South Africa’s Constitution. It is a crucial element in South Africa’s exemplary system of checks and balances and is designed to preserve the independence of the judiciary. Theoretically, the President is unable to appoint his choice of Chief Justice until he has consulted with the JSC and leaders of opposition parties, receiving and considering their comments.

Sciopero

The Crises in Italian Football and Politics

By Sebastiano Sali

Italy is widely renowned as one of the most beautiful countries in the world. Among the many reasons for this is the colourful world that surrounds football, with all its social traditions and customs. This is a world that can count many fans outside the Boot itself, like Tim Parks, the most famous Englishman who put his interest for Italian football into a book. However, the current temperature of Italian football is way below zero: it is frozen, like a dead body. Whether this has anything to do with global warming or the Berlusconi government, who knows?